Michael Fullan

Motion Leadership

ACT: On the Move

Posted March 25, 2014 in Videos by admin

This video has been made possible by Michael Fullan Enterprises and the Department of Education and Training, ACT Government, and is a part of the work Fullan calls Motion Leadership in Action. This production was part of Michael Fullan’s 2012 Australian Motion Leadership tour.

Thank you to the staff at the Department of Education and Training, ACT Government.

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Canberra High School: On the Pathway

Posted in Videos by admin

This video has been made possible by Michael Fullan Enterprises and the Department of Education and Training, ACT Government, and is a part of the work Fullan calls Motion Leadership in Action. This production was part of Michael Fullan’s 2012 Australian Motion Leadership tour.

Thank you to the staff and students at Canberra High School.

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Dickson College: A Skinny Journey

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This video has been made possible by Michael Fullan Enterprises and the Department of Education and Training, ACT Government, and is a part of the work Fullan calls Motion Leadership in Action. This production was part of Michael Fullan’s 2012 Australian Motion Leadership tour.

Thank you to the staff and students at Dickson College.

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Big-City School Reform: Lessons from New York, Toronto, and London

Posted March 14, 2014 in News by admin

Michael Fullan and Alan Boyle
Pub Date: March 2014, 192 pages

This encouraging book draws on the recent experiences of New York, London, and Toronto to identify what it takes to transform big-city school systems. It recognises their complexities without being overawed by them. By concentrating on the factors that seem to matter most, it offers real hope that we can now tackle some of the key issues that have frustrated reform efforts in the past.”

Geoff Whitty, director emeritus, Institute of Education, University of London, UK

“Fullan and Boyle present a compelling framework for motivating and sustaining improvement in large urban school districts. The authors’ premise that system leaders must optimally balance push and pull strategies serves as an important lesson to school-level leaders as well.”
Sandra J. Stein, education and leadership consultant

“In this important new book, Fullan and Boyle answer the most important question facing the leaders of the world’s major cities: what will it take to significantly improve the quality of public education? Through a sophisticated analysis of the policies pursued in New York, Toronto, and London, the authors make it possible for us to see why some cities are making more progress than others. Their clear and compelling insights couldn’t be more relevant and timely.”
Pedro A. Noguera, Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Development, Executive Director, Metropolitan Center for Urban Education, New York University

Big cities have struggled to improve public school systems. This book shows why—and offers a framework for achieving future success. Fullan and Boyle, internationally renowned thinkers on school change, demonstrate that while the educational challenges of big cities may be overwhelming, they are not insurmountable. They draw on ten years’ of research to identify six essential “push” and “pull” actions that enable big school systems to improve student achievement.

Leaders must push to challenge the status quo, convey a high sense of urgency, and have the courage needed to intervene. But they need to also pull together to create a commonly-owned strategy, develop professional power, and attend to sustainability. Examining three major cities—New York, Toronto, and London—through the decade of 2002–2012, this book weaves case studies with careful analysis and recommendations to hone in on which policies and strategies work best to raise the bar for all students and reduce the gap for the disadvantaged. Big-City School Reforms offers invaluable advice to those leading the next phase of school reform in cities around the world. This is an eminently practical book that focuses on big problems and big solutions.

http://www.amazon.ca/Big-City-School-Reforms-Lessons-Toronto/dp/0807755192/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394802235&sr=1-1&keywords=big+city+school+reforms

 

 

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AACTE to Honor Hargreaves-Fullan Book on ‘Professional Capital’

Posted February 24, 2014 in News by admin

(Feb. 19, 2014, Washington, D.C.) – The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) will present its 2014 Outstanding Book Award to Andy Hargreaves, Ph.D., and Michael Fullan, Ph.D., for their monograph Professional Capital: Transforming Teaching in Every School. The award, which recognizes exemplary books that make a significant contribution to the knowledge base of educator preparation or of teaching and learning with implications for educator preparation, will be presented March 3 at AACTE’s 66th Annual Meeting in Indianapolis.

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There is Something Different About 2014

Posted January 26, 2014 in News by admin

Message from Michael

I have been working on educational change for almost 50 years. There is something different about 2014. There is a grand convergence spontaneously erupting. I think it is a natural dynamic of push and pull. The push, to put it directly, is a combination of the boredom and alienation of students and teachers. Students won’t wait, and teachers can’t wait. It is simply intolerable for students and teachers to be at school every day when increasing numbers of them would rather be somewhere else. What kind of existence is that!

On the other hand the digital world is a 24/7 phenomenon of limitless intrigue and consternation. There is something out there but it cannot be fathomed. Humans have stopped evolving physically, but the brain is changing in uncontainable ways. Humankind’s relationship to the universe is becoming seamless. There is no distinction between us and mother nature; between us and what we are creating– digitally, artistically, and spontaneously. We are what we create, and what incubates ineluctably becomes us.

We are seeing combustions that are as inevitable as they are mysterious. They are unstoppable. This is what I have called The Stratosphere. Technology, pedagogy and change dynamics are converging on their own. We cannot stop them but we can take advantage of them to enable and accelerate learning, where learning and living become indistinguishable. This is not a theoretical realm. It is reality.

These developments are grounded. Let me count the ways. Maria Langworthy and I wrote a report called A Rich Seam: How New Pedagogies Find Deep Learning (commissioned by Pearson, www.michaelfullan.ca). It takes multiple examples of how new deep learning is erupting in schools around the globe. In these situations the learning day is no longer punctuated by the 9 to 3 clock; it is 24/7 seamless. We see it in the videos we are beginning to compile from schools and school systems (again go the michaelfullan.ca to view these early examples). We see it in our new pedagogies project where we are working with 10 clusters of 100 schools from 10 different countries—1,000 schools easily jumping on a journey of unknown but exciting destinations (new pedagogies.org). We see in in new conceptions of The Principal (Fullan, Jossey-Bass, 2014) where school leaders are shaping the education of teachers and students in collaborative learning cultures; where they are becoming ‘system players’, and multiplicative change agents. We see it in what Andy Hargreaves and I have called the Professional Capital of Teachers. We see it in big systems that are struggling to latch onto new powerful ‘drivers’ for whole system change—look to California with its 7 million students to find the way; to New York City as it sheds the shackles of one-way accountability from the top, to Poland as it tastes the freedom of purposeful directional vision with unknown but exciting pathways, and to Latin America, Africa, Asia and the Middle East as these giant systems awaken to learning that will become increasingly accessible to all.

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A Rich Seam: How New Pedagogies Find Deep Learning

Posted January 22, 2014 in News by admin

Authors: Michael Fullan and Maria Langworthy

Michael Fullan and Sir Michael Barber, chief education advisor to Pearson, former head of McKinsey’s Global Education Practice and UK government advisor, will lead the launch of A Rich Seam at Pearson’s London office on September 22nd. The speakers will unveil the findings of the report to a selected audience of educationists, academics, policy advisors and media commentators, before leading a live Q&A, which will be live-streamed to a global audience.

The report by Michael Fullan and Maria Langworthy is the first in a new series of publications published by Pearson. It addresses the challenges encountered when trying to implement new pedagogies on a large scale as well as providing examples of changes happening in classrooms, in schools and across a few education systems.
This publication describes a rich seam of insight into how education systems are beginning to change. The “new pedagogies” are not just instructional strategies – they are powerful models of teaching and learning, enabled and accelerated by increasingly pervasive digital tools and resources and support deep learning at all levels of the education system. “Deep learning” develops the learning, creating and ‘doing’ dispositions that youth need to thrive now and in their futures.

With the support of Pearson, and as part of A Rich Seam: How New Pedagogies Find Deep Learning, Michael Fullan produced a series of videos which can be viewed under the ‘Video’ tab of this website or accessed through YouTube. These videos are what Fullan calls ‘Motion Leadership in Action.

Central Peel Secondary School

Filmed at Central Peel Secondary School, Michael Fullan captures principal Lawrence DeMaeyer, classroom teachers, and students to reveal how Central Peel Secondary School is getting such great results.

Park Manor Public School

Principal James Bond, classroom teachers, and students are interviewed by Michael Fullan. This videos explains the results of Park Manor and their Accelerated Learning Framework.

William G. Davis Sr. Public School

In this short video, Michael works with William G. Davis Sr. Public School and principal Andreas Meyer, classroom teachers, and students to capture their digital journey.

Please see the attached full PDF report:

A Rich Seam - Click to Download

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